Header Ads

test

Google and Facebook Stand Against Hate Groups By Brett Keane

Brett Keane - First I want to say it saddens me the loss of lives. Innocent people killed over the hateful idea's people have in their heads. This whole thing proves what I've known all along. Hate Groups and the ignorant use freedom of speech as a mask and weapon to harm others physically and emotionally. 


My life has been virtually ruined through the internet because of hate groups who attack me for being a Theist (One who believes in God). Companies allowed hate and threats towards me and claimed people had the right to harm one another. The truth is they didn't care. Google wanted to sell ads.

Now that it has come to a head and people have been killed do to the internet allowing hate groups to be funded and raise armies of despicable people...Companies and humanity have taken notice and will now take action. I couldn't be more pleased. However...

We should not erase our history. Statues mean nothing to me. In fact God speaks against engraven images. But we should always know where we came from and learn from our past.

Now let's take a look at what online companies are doing about hate below. Some may not realize this but everyone of these companies already had terms of service and community guidelines...they just didn't bother enforcing them. Because we're not people to them. We're simply customers who bought their ads. But things are going to get real. Read below.

(snippets of news all over the net)

In the wake of the Charlottesville Unite the Right rally, which left an activist dead and many injured, some leading tech companies are taking a stand against extremist views.
Last week Friday, right-wing blogger Jason Kessler organized a rally to protest Charlottesville's decision to remove a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from a city park.
The rally ended in violence as supporters and counter-protesters chanted and threw punches and newspaper stands, according to the Associated Press.
In the midst of the weekend brawl, female activist Heather Heyer was killed when a car plowed into a crowd of people protesting the white nationalist rally. Far right websites have since come out supporting this act of domestic terrorism.
Here's how GoDaddy, Google, Paypal, Reddit, Twitter and Facebook have responded:

GoDaddy

The domain name provider severed ties with the neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer after the site verbally attacked Heyer. A recent post from the site mocked the deceased 32-year-old, calling her "fat" and "childless." It added that "most people are glad she is dead, as she is the definition of uselessness."
GoDaddy tweeted on Sunday that it had given The Daily Stormer 24 hours to move its domain because the site had violated the company's terms of service.

.@GoDaddy you host The Daily Stormer - they posted this on their site. Please retweet if you think this hate should be taken down & banned. pic.twitter.com/fqTtGoTbmn
We informed The Daily Stormer that they have 24 hours to move the domain to another provider, as they have violated our terms of service.

In an interview with CNBC, the company's CEO Blake Irving said that the Daily Stormer crossed the line from exercising freedom of speech to provoking further mayhem.
"We always have to ride the fence on making sure we are protecting a free and open internet," says Irving. "But when the line gets crossed and that speech starts to incite violence, then we have a responsibility to take that down."

Google

The Daily Stormer moved its domain registration to Google after hosting firm GoDaddy cut ties with the site.
Customers can transfer domains to Google through an automated, online process that takes up to 20 minutes, according to the Internet company's domain registration site.
But shortly after making the transition, Google promptly canceled the registration for the white supremacist website.
"We are cancelling Daily Stormer's registration with Google Domains for violating our terms of service," the company representative said in a statement to CNBC.
57357212JM002_Google_sign_i
Jeff J Mitchell | Getty Images
In June, the company released a blog post in which it denounced the use of Google platforms for terrorist activity. "There should be no place for terrorist content on our service," said Kent Walker, senior vice president and general counsel of Google.
He added: "While we and others have worked for years to identify and remove content that violates our policies the uncomfortable truth is that we, as an industry, must acknowledge that more needs to be done. Now."

Paypal

The online payment platform vowed to pull its services from sites linked to hate, violence and intolerance, after reflecting on the tragic events in Charlottesville.
Paypal had previously been accused of playing a prominent role in raising money for the deadly white supremacist rally.
"We've been working directly with PayPal for months to cut off a number of hate groups that they allowed for years to generate revenue using their platform," says Rashad Robinson, the executive director of Color Of Change, the nation's largest online racial justice organization, in a statement to CNBC.
PayPal
Source: CNBC
In a lengthy post published on Tuesday, PayPal says that it has a longstanding acceptable use policy and that the company strives to navigate the balance between freedom of expression and the closing of sites that advocate intolerant views.
"Regardless of the individual or organization in question, we work to ensure that our services are not used to accept payments or donations for activities that promote hate, violence or racial intolerance," said the post.
"This includes organizations that advocate racist views, such as the KKK, white supremacist groups or Nazi groups."

Reddit

The social news aggregation site confirmed to CNET that it will ban pages and groups linked to far-right extremists.
Reddit's action was reportedly prompted by a subreddit, which was flagged for making inflammatory remarks and threats. The thread included calls for a return to segregation and expressed hopes that someone would "bomb CNN and kill people."


Reddit users quickly called on the website to take steps in combating the hate speech.
"We are very clear in our site terms of service that posting content that incites violence will get users banned from Reddit," a company spokesperson told CNET.

Twitter

The social networking service joined other Silicon Valley companies on Wednesday in suspending accounts linked to the Daily Stormer.
A man holds a laptop showing an image of US president Donald Trump with a Twitter logo displayed in the background in this photo illustration.
Jaap Arriens | NurPhoto | Getty Images
A man holds a laptop showing an image of US president Donald Trump with a Twitter logo displayed in the background in this photo illustration.
At least three accounts that were associated with the neo-Nazi website led to pages saying "account suspended," according to Reuters.
Although Twitter did not discuss individual accounts, the company released a statement saying that the social network will take action on accounts that violate its policies prohibiting violent threats, harassment and hateful conduct.

Facebook

The social media platform, which has doubled down on its war against fake news, confirmed to CNET that it has removed and banned group pages that violated hate speech policies.
Facebook also confirmed that it had removed the Charlottesville Unite the Right event page and was currently removing all links to the aforementioned Daily Stormer post.
Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg
Photo by Antoine Antoniol
Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg
Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg spoke out against the violence in Charlottesville on Monday.
She says: "Along with millions of others, I was so heartbroken this weekend. The brave Heather Heyer's mother Susan Bro said she wanted her daughter's 'death to be a rallying cry for justice and equality and fairness and compassion. Let's honor her by teaching all of our children how to honor and respect those values."
Powered by Blogger.